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Winter Skincare

Winter Skincare
We all know we shouldn’t be lazy when it comes to our winter skincare regime. Yet every year when the colder months come around, we find ourselves slacking on the routine we were so dedicated to, during the summer. It’s easy to become indifferent to skincare when you’re covered by a ton of layers, but trust us when we say, your skin will thank you for being attentive year-round!
Here are a few tips to keep in mind when updating your winter skincare routine.

GSR™: Getting Skin Ready

ZO Skin Health’s first steps to achieving healthy skin are; cleanse, scrub and oil-control. These objectives enable the skin to function properly and to tolerate all daily exposure and activities.

Correction

You can correct and restore the surface texture of your skin through exfoliation. Exfoliating promotes skin-cell turnover and avoids a build up of dead skin cells to allow your skin to look it’s freshest.

SPF

Remember to ensure that your daily primer or cream has SPF such as our Oclipse Sunscreen + Primer in SPF30. UV rays can still damage your skin even in winter so an SPF is always essential.

Stabilisation

As the temperatures drop and indoor heating rises, it will cause your skin to become dull and lack-lustre. So after you’ve cleansed your face, it’s essential that you strengthen your skin and restore normal hydration to it. ZO’s Ossential Daily Power Defense is the perfect serum as it speeds up the skin’s natural mechanism to repair DNA damage and protect against future oxidative damage. In addition to providing antioxidant protection to combat free-radical damage and restore the skin’s barrier system.

Diet

During the summer you’re constantly drinking water because of the warmer weather but in the winter it’s still just as important to keep yourself hydrated. It doesn’t matter how good your skincare routine is, if you’re not drinking enough your water, your skin will be negatively affected. Alongside a healthy supply of water, your body also needs as good a diet as ever, so avoid the comfort foods and stick to healthy alternatives.

The most common skin conditions – Dr. Siún Murphy

Interview with Dr. Siún Murphy, Blackrock Clinic, about the most common skin conditions.

Under the Skin is a one-to-one interview that addresses different skin issues and concerns, providing the latest information about ZO Skin Health protocols and treatments for the consumer clients.

Anti-Aging skincare for those in their mid-20s

Interview with Dr. Petrou-Amerikanos, Agno Aesthetics, about anti ageing skincare program for mid 20s.
Under the Skin is a one-to-one interview that addresses different skin issues and concerns, providing the latest information about ZO Skin Health protocols and treatments for the consumer clients.

Under the Skin: The Most Common Skin Conditions – Dr. Claire Oliver

Interview with Dr. Claire Oliver, Air Aesthetics Clinic, about the most common skin conditions and how to treat them.
Under the Skin is a one-to-one interview that addresses different skin issues and concerns, providing the latest information about ZO Skin Health protocols and treatments for the consumer clients.

Under the Skin: How to treat sun damaged skin – Dr Eccleston

Interview with Dr. David Eccleston, Medizen Clinic, about how to treat sun damaged skin.
Under the Skin is a one-to-one interview that addresses different skin issues and concerns, providing the latest information about ZO Skin Health protocols and treatments for the consumer clients.

Under the Skin: The Most Common Skin Conditions – Dr Eccleston

Interview with Dr. David Eccleston, Medizen Clinic, about the most common skin conditions and how to treat them.
Under the Skin is a one-to-one interview that addresses different skin issues and concerns, providing the latest information about ZO Skin Health protocols and treatments for the consumer clients.

The most common skin conditions and how to treat them

 

How to get rid of hyperpigmentation on the skin

Hyperpigmentation is a change in skin colour, usually of the face, but often also of the hands and other parts of the body most exposed to solar radiation. It is a common problem, regardless of skin colour or ethnic origin.

Hyperpigmentation can spread to the entire surface of the skin, either affecting different areas or restricted to individual parts.

Human skin contains cells that produce melanin (melanocytes), a pigment that gives colour to the skin and helps protect the body from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. An overproduction of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation of the skin.

Types of hyperpigmentation

Hyperpigmentation includes many different forms.

Freckles are small circular dark spots, focused on the face, shoulders, neck, torso and hands, more commonly found on people with fair skin and red or blond hair. They are present all year round on the face of these subjects but became more evident in the summer with exposure to sunlight.

Another form of freckle is solar lentigos, also known as liver spots, that are formed due to overexposure to radiation of the sun; it is more commonly called “sunspots skin”.

The senile lentigo is formed by the accumulation of damage caused by sun exposure.

Another form of hyperpigmentation, rather severe, is melasma, caused by an intense and uneven accumulation of melanin. If the freckles are just small spots, melasma is a spot much more extensive and unsightly.

Finally there is the post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation that is formed in the presence of scars, burns, eczema and acne.

ZO Skin Health and Medical products and protocols are optimised to treat a wide range of skin disorders and chronic conditions including all forms of hyperpigmentation.

Causes, and how to get rid of hyperpigmentation

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How to protect your skin from sun damage. INFOGRAPHIC

In our society, tanned skin is often synonymous with healthy, young and beautiful skin. Unfortunately,  repeated exposure to the sun leaves indelible marks, even on the most perfect of skin.

Regardless of whether you skin has burnt, reddened or tanned from the sun, they are all symptoms of your immune systems response to ultraviolet radiation, which is a consequence of RNA damage to skin cells.

Ultraviolet rays are divided into three categories, according to their wavelength: UVA, UVB and UVC.  UVC rays are not a problem, thanks to the atmosphere that filters them. However, UVA rays can still penetrate the dermis, while UVB rays reach the surface layer of the skin and discharge all their energy (higher than UVA) into epidermal cells and especially DNA. The sunburn you experience is caused by UVB rays. Nevertheless, though UVA rays do not cause sunburn, in the long run, they can lead to a degeneration of elastic fibres and collagen in the dermis, which results in a loss of elasticity in the skin.

The target of solar radiation is cellular DNA and can cause a considerable amount of damage to the double helix. In response, your body begins the production of free radicals, releasing destructive enzymes called hydrolases. This phenomenon is called photo-ageing, the biological process by which the sun’s rays causes premature ageing at the deepest point of the skin.

It is important to protect your skin from UVA and UVB rays with a good sunscreen. If the skin is sensitive it will require a cream with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30.

ZO Skin Health and Medical offer effective daily solutions to minimise UV damage, prevent DNA damage and protect the skin from environmental aggressors to improve overall skin health.

Info Sun Damage

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