Sensitive Skin Misconceptions

Moisturisers are popular products, especially among women. More than 90 percent of the population seek a program that offers moisturisation for a temporary feeling of skin smoothness.  sensitive skin

Moisturisers and Sensitive Skin

Moisturisers can only offer momentary relief for symptoms such as irritation, roughness or itching. The improved surface texture through artificial smoothing or plumping of the skin is fleeting and a superficial improvement. The truth is that these products are ineffective and lack any real benefit.While the occasional use of hydrators when absolutely necessary is acceptable, to depend upon them for hydration and calm skin on a daily basis is wrong. What’s more, repeatedly using moisturisers has a remarkably negative impact on your skin, making it weaker and drier. It is detrimental to skin cellular functions, arresting the skin’s ability to renew itself, leading to the appearance of ‘sensitive skin’ and an acceleration of skin ageing.

sensitive skinCompanies Fuelling The Sensitive Skin Market

Companies within the cosmetic industry are in constant competition to try and outdo one another. They produce a wide variety of moisturisers (plain, light, heavy, with or without anti-ageing claims, etc.) to appeal to everyone. Many consumers assume that any product that causes burning, exfoliation or redness is bad for the skin. While moisturisers are marketed as ‘gentle’, ‘non-irritating’, ‘soothing’, etc., to appeal to all.  Due to this general intolerance to skin discomfort and the belief (and fear) that any form of irritation is bad, many believe they have sensitive skin. This ‘sensitive skin’ trend, has provided a new market for companies to create and sell products that contain stronger moisturisers, which can actually make skin more sensitive.

sensitive skinSensitive Skin in Women

You will notice that the emergence of ‘sensitive skin’ is mainly seen in women. Men and children commonly do not use moisturisers, while women are often taught to use moisturisers from their teenage years. As a result, their skin becomes addicted to this product and brings a whole host of other issues with it.

Overall, skin sensitivity is not really a sensitivity disorder. A sensitivity disorder can be seen with certain cases of genuine skin dryness (not dehydrated skin) or genetic disorders. In fact, ‘sensitive skin’ could more accurately be labelled a skin weakness or intolerance.